L-carnitine

L-carnitine is very similar to the nonessential amino acid carnitine. It performs some of the same functions, such as helping metabolize food into energy.

L-carnitine nourishes the heart, nourishes and strengthens muscles, and nutritionally supports the circulatory system. L-Carnitine is considered to be a “carrier” of fat to the mitochondria (the powerplant / “fatburning” area of the cell). This remarkable amino acid-like substance is not only necessary for the metabolism of fat at the cellular level; it is also essential in the forming of firm, lean muscle tissue in the body. Recent studies support earlier research which shows that the heart has the greatest amount of L-Carnitine of any muscle in the body. L-Carnitine has also shown to be instrumental in the metabolism of cholesterol. Some overweight people may lack L-Carnitine in their bodies. The heart produces most of its energy from fats; thus is dependent upon L-carnitine.

An L-Carnitine deficiency causes extreme metabolic impairment to heart tissue. On the other hand, supplemental L-Carnitine has proved to be beneficial to heart patients.

How Does L-carnitine Work?

L-carnitine transfers long-chain fatty acids, such as triglycerides into mitochondria (a cell’s energy powerhouse), where they may be oxidized to produce energy. L-carnitine is a very popular supplement that promotes growth and development. It is also used for fat-burning, increasing energy, and improving resistance to muscle fatigue. As a speculated muscle disease, liver disease, and kidney disease fighter, L-carnitine has also been shown to help build muscle and treat some forms of cardiovascular disease. It is also great in dieting, as it reduces feelings of hunger and weakness – helping curb your appetite.

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